Keystone RV’s Vantage 32FLS

Keystone Vantage 32FLS

Photo Credit: Keystone RVs

The Keystone Vantage 32FLS looks a bit like an airstream, but don't judge an RV by its cover.

Bruce Hampson
March 7, 2012
Filed under Top Stories, Trailer Reviews

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Resembling an industry icon sometimes isn’t all it’s cracked up to be. There are inevitable comparisons — and inevitable expectations. And when a company introduces a new product with styling cues that invite comparison to not one, but two storied profiles, those expectations tend to shoot right off the charts.

Judging Keystone RV’s all-new Vantage travel trailer simply by its silhouette, however, misses the mark entirely. Sure, if you squint at it you might find certain aspects of its design suggestive of an Airstream towable. And its curved fiberglass sidewalls and panoramic windows are, indeed, reminiscent of the fuselage-shaped GMC motorhomes of the mid-’70s.

That said, this sleek, grey-toned trailer is about as far from being a recycled classic as you can get. It’s just the opposite, in fact. The trailer owes its existence to state-of-the-art construction technology, which allowed Keystone to utilize a vacuum-bonded laminating process to create the radius sidewalls inside and out. Wrapped around a six-sided aluminum cage and finished with uniform window lines, contoured and molded front and rear caps, and a 7-inch rolled roof edge, the pronounced sidewall curvature adds 6 additional inches of exterior width – to 8 feet 6 inches – at its beltline. The roof, too, is arched, with headroom increasing from 6 feet 6 inches, at the sidewall/ceiling junction to 6 feet 10 inches, at its apex.

What that all adds up to is the kind of open environment you can only achieve with a wide-body RV.

The Keystone Vantage 32FLS has queen bed and a large, lighted wardrobe closet add to the residential feel.

The Keystone Vantage 32FLS has queen bed and a large, lighted wardrobe closet add to the residential feel.

We were able to spend some time in what may be the most traditional of the three floorplans in production, the rear-bedroom 32FLS.

One of two models with 30-inch-wide front and rear entry/exit doors, the 32FLS features an impressive open floorplan. With an airbed sofa tucked into the nose, the 35-foot 10-inch long trailer places a curbside dinette just aft of the front door, backed by a well-designed wall divider that’s home to a 32-inch LCD TV, 12-volt DC AM/FM/CD/DVD stereo with MP3 hookup, a small pullout pantry (with countertop) and lots of open storage. Both dinette seats also conceal pullout drawers, and the freestanding dinette table can be moved at will.

Opposite the dining/viewing area is the trailer’s single slideout, stretching 10 feet 4 inches and home to a wealth of cabinetry, single-bowl sink with pullout sprayer faucet, three-burner range, microwave and 6-cubic-foot refrigerator. While the slideout extends just 18 inches, when combined with the radius walls it opens up the interior dramatically. Just as noteworthy, though, is that it allows easy front-to-back access through the interior when it’s retracted.

The Vantage’s front interior boasts an open floorplan with an airbed sofa and curbside dinette.

The Vantage’s front interior boasts an open floorplan with an airbed sofa and curbside dinette.

A fairly spacious curbside bathroom with sizable tub/shower enclosure, foot-flush porcelain toilet, mirrored medicine cabinet and sink/vanity separates the rear bedroom from the living quarters. In this floorplan, the streetside wall opposite the bath is fitted with cabinets, making access to towels, linens and even a change of clothes a snap. There is also a wealth of storage throughout the interior, which makes up for the single external storage bay (accessing space beneath the bed).

Since all Vantage floorplans include a single slideout in the main cabin, you might expect a 60-by-80-inch queen bed to make for tight quarters between standard walls, especially when mounted transversely. This is where those six extra inches of width, courtesy of the radius walls, really make a difference. A large, lighted wardrobe closet boasting mirrored doors and contemporary mullions fills the rear cap. The windows on both sides open for cross-ventilation.

The interior "is a little more progressive" than most RVs on the road.

The interior "is a little more progressive" than most RVs on the road.

The interior “is a little more progressive,” noted Joe Kalil, Keystone’s director of interior design. “We added a vinyl floor that looks like stained concrete, all the hardware matches, we styled the furniture to be very comfortable but more clean-lined and contemporary, and we used LED lighting liberally inside — all the ceiling lights except for above the dinette are LED. It’s nice, clean, color-temperature-correct lighting, and it takes a fraction of the power to use. You can easily light up this unit with a battery.”

 

Keystone RV, (574) 535-2100, www.keystonerv.com.

 

Specifications:

The Keystone Vantage 32FLS makes good use of space and keeps enough room to move around.

The Keystone Vantage 32FLS makes good use of space and keeps enough room to move around.

Ext Length: 35’10”
Ext Width: 8’ 6”
Ext Height: 10’ 6”
Int Height: 6’ 10”
Freshwater Cap: 50 gal
Black-/Gray-water Cap: 30 gal/30 gal
LP-gas Cap: 14 gal
Hitch Weight: 1,035 lb
GVWR: 8,200 lb
MSRP Base $37,205

 

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Comments

13 Responses to “Keystone RV’s Vantage 32FLS”

  1. raynardo on March 7th, 2012 6:42 pm

    Another name for this unit should be “La Cave”. It’s hurting for interior light with a limited number of windows. This “feature” totally turns me off. The trailer looks too dark, it needs to be brighter and airier.

    It’s also missing some things I’ll never be without on a travel trailer – an outside cooking area as well as a pass-through storage area.

    The flat screen TV is over half the trailer away from the couch, making it too small, both for viewing and volume. And since the couch folds out into a bed there are no recliner options – terrible!

    It seems to me that most trailer designers are stuck in the same rut they’ve been in for 70 years! Bed here, dinette here, kitchen here. Shake it up a bit.

    Here’s an idea – design a 32′ trailer for just two people. A big bed and no fold out couch or dinette table. And we don’t need a big oven, we won’t be cooking scrumptious meals all the time. A stove and microwave is good enough. Plenty of storage intelligently done with pull-outs galore. A TV that’s close to comfortable seating area – heck maybe even recliners with dinner trays that pop out of the arm rests. LED lighting everywhere, and maybe even a built-in ultra quiet generator that runs on LP gas.

    Ah, it’s all wishful thinking. But I can wish, can’t I?

    [Reply]

    paul Reply:

    I wholeheartedly agree with Raynardo. Time for manufactures to realize less is more, lighter weight equals better gas milage, just wo retired folks ought to be able to get better choices!!!

    [Reply]

  2. Ken Mays on March 15th, 2012 8:55 pm

    I agree with the comments except for the out side cooking area. I pull a Fleetwood Triumph (32 ft) and it is one of the best designed trailers I have ever pulled. Lots of storage and made for two.

    [Reply]

  3. Ed McDougall on March 15th, 2012 11:28 pm

    From the looks of it I can’t see where the $37,200 price tag (plus tax, tag and all those little necessary extras) comes from. The axels are too far back, creating a heavier than necessary tongue weight. The capacities (30 gal. per tank) are less than should be expected for a 32′ trailer, or a 25′ trailer for that matter. Fore and aft doors are a waste of space and pose a greater security risk. The slider’s life expectancy is greatly limited due to the weight of the kitchen appliances all being placed upon it not to mention the stress placed on the plumbing, electric and gas lines flexing in and out at each stop. The bathroom is small and the lav countertop looks like a good portion of it is stuffed down the side of the shower stall with some inaccessible space at the end of it in the corner. Tell me, how does the wife retrieve her hair drier from back there? Really, 14 gal. of propane? Could you spare it? Forget the genertor “raynardo”, there’s not enough gas to run it on. (I do like your other idears though). This is a “camper(ing) trailer” folks, not a million dollar luxury coach. What’s with the fancy furnishings? Get real. Put some economically priced, servicable and comfortable furnishings in it and cut the smaltch. As is the case with most camping equipment manufacturers, they hire people in their planing and development departments that have never spent a night in a back yard tent never mind a month on the road. But, look at the bright side. All the hardware matches! And the interior is a whole 6″ wider on the inside. My, that’s almost twice as long as my middle finger! And, think of it, the slider extends a whopping 18″. That’s five inches longer than my foot! $37,200? You can fool yo momma, ya can’t fool me!

    [Reply]

  4. E. Phillips on March 16th, 2012 10:30 am

    Think you’ve heard enough? Too much fluff, not enough “comfort”. Consider
    “travelers” and “campers” trying to enjoy lazy easy times, not “show offs”. Normally only 2 people travel, thus who needs fold out couch- recliners are better suited. Got more travelers? Go for bunk-house style. More thought to more room in bath. We have a rear bath in our present unit (the whole rear) with large corner shower, sizable vanity, and closet- it couldn’t be better. Need to SEE entertainment, and without having to constantly be turned at strange angles (opposite sitting area is great. Again, more comfort after long days traveling or…..). Think RELAXING, unwinding….

    [Reply]

  5. Desert Rat on March 19th, 2012 5:06 pm

    We are new owners of a 32FLS Vantage and absolutely love it. The interior is bright and airy so I am not sure where the above comments about it being “dark” come from. The interior is perfectly designed for what my husband and I were looking for. The amount of interior storage continues to amaze me. All I can say in regard to all the above negatives is if it is not your cup of tea buy a different trailer. I absolutely love ours.

    [Reply]

  6. LEWIS on April 18th, 2012 9:15 pm

    LOOKED AT THE VANTAGE LAST SATURDAY. THE UNIT WAS NEW TO THE RV DEALER AND SHE DID NOT HAVE A LOT OF INFO.. I FOUND THE UNIT QUIT LOW TO THE GROUND AND I FEEL THIS COULD BE A PROBLEM WHILE TAKING THE UNIT OFF THE PAVEMENT. I ASKED IF THE AXIAL COULD BE FILPPED AND WAS TOLD IT COULD BUT IT WOULD VOID THE WARRANTY ON THE CHASSIS. OTHERWISE, I DID FEEL THIS IS A NICE UNIT.. I LIKE THE CEILING HEIGHT, LOTS OF STORAGE, AND THE REAR DOOR THAT GIVES ACCESS TO THE BATH DURING TRAVEL. THE BED ROOM WAS GOOD SIZE. I LIVE IN ARIZONA AND WOULD LIKE TO KNOW IF I COULD GET A LARGER AC UNIT. I THINK THE ANSWER IS NO DUE TO THE SIZE OF THE ELECTRICAL SERVICE. THIS MAY BE AN OPTION IN THE FUTURE. SINCE THIS IS A NEW UNIT, I FEEL A FEW BUGS NEED TI GET WORKED OUT.

    [Reply]

    Desert Rat Reply:

    Lewis,

    We live in the Mojave Desert and have a Vantage 32FLS. We tested the Air Conditioning (15,000 BTU unit) yesterday when it hit 100 degrees and it seemed to keep the trailer cool. The front was definitely cooler than the bedroom but I did not adjust the vents to direct air flow more to the back and I had the bathroom door open.

    We have not had any issues with the low ground clearance but we have not had the unit off pavement and probably never will. If we were the type to go off pavement I would probably not have picked this trailer. We do take any driveway type incline very slowly just in case.

    We are extremely happy with our Vantage. We find it roomy with abundant storage. To me, it does not seem boxy inside as many of the trailers we looked at. I would guess alot depends on what type of use you will have. Personally, we will likely never take her off-pavement or dry camping.

    My husband finds her surprisingly easy to tow (Tundra V8(?) w/tow package, equailzer hitch). When we were coming back from the coast a couple weekends ago with some high winds our friends with a Class A had to slow down to 40-45 and we were able to safely continue at 55.

    [Reply]

  7. NeilNJ on July 13th, 2012 8:34 am

    Raynardo and Paul are dim-wits.. LOL. Show me a TT with more windows and natural lighting. I purchased the 32FLS and compare it more to Class-A comfort. The interior has far better quality than all the other TT’s we looked at. We also looked at the 32QBS that has 4 large bunks in the rear and the queen moved to the front with the sofa/air bed as part of the slide out… We decided we would never want 8 or 9 people in the camper at one time, 4 or 5 is more than enough for us. The next step would be a 5th wheel setup but who wants to buy a 50K+ dually truck to pull it? Rather go Class-A at that point. BTW,, I got the 32FLS for under 30K.

    [Reply]

  8. ERIK on August 25th, 2012 9:23 pm

    YOUR RIGHT NEIL THEIR BOTH DUMB ASS’S THE TRAILER IS PERFACTLY BALANCED TOW REAL GOOD AND I ONLY PAID 26K OUT THE DOOR

    [Reply]

  9. JimmyJ on October 12th, 2012 12:09 am

    I can’t understand all the negative comments either. In my opinion, this is one of the better floor plans I have seen in a very long time. And consider this, there are different types of RV people: people who go camping, people who use the trailer for vacation travels, and full timer.
    In my opinion, this trailer is not a camping unit, it is a unit that is excellent for a full time single person, or a couple. It is definitely not a weekend camper for the family.
    Not enough windows ? Are you kidding ? Have you actually been in the trailer ? A cave ? This is a very open and spacious floor plan. Too much weight on the side ? The side only extends 18″ so most of the weight is still within the body of the unit. And as compared to what ? Do you think a sofa bed and a dinette weigh less than the small counter area that in in this side ?
    I don’t think “raynardo” has a clue…
    And finally, lighter weigh ? The thing is almost 36 feet long. It only weights about 6500 lbs dry. Can you get any lighter ? Find a 36 foot 5th wheel with that low weight – impossible.
    If you want bunks, lazy boy recliners, outdoor kitchens and so on, look for a family camper. This trailer is for people who are full time and for those who travel often. It is a highway burner. An excellent well thought out design.

    [Reply]

    ednjulie1 Reply:

    I totally agree with JimmyJ…. The negative comments are completely unwarranted! My wife and I looked at hundreds of floor plans with various manufact… The Keystone Vantage was a perfect design for the two of us. The curved walls opens up the floor plan and the windows…. come on they are EVERYWHERE. It is a well built unit with a great design, especially regarding interior storage…. show me a comparable unit with more interior storage… you can’t… the wife and I spent over an hour with a tape measure taking measurements of every singe storage space…and they are all over the unit.
    The trailer is upscale in quality and livability.
    A complete winner in my book!

    [Reply]

  10. Lee on January 31st, 2013 11:45 am

    Looked at this brand and at Airstream units at the local RV show in Pleasanton, CA this January and came away very impressed with the Vantage’s quality interior & design and surprisingly disappointed with the flimsy interior and so-so fit and finish of the Airstream units.

    It would appear to me that Airstream is not just resting on it’s reputation but is letting companies like Keystone an Livin’ Lite surpass it in quality and technical progress. For my money I have decided to purchase a Livin’ Lite 13QBB over an Airstream Bambi even though cost is not an issue for me. If A Vantage model were available in something similar in size (18′) I would have tough decision to make.

    [Reply]

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