As part of our online series on 2019 trucks, Chris Hemer reviews the new Ford F-150 and its towing features

Ford really upset the applecart in 2015 when it introduced an all-aluminum alloy body for its flagship F-150, and ever since then, the competition has been playing catch-up. Not content to sit upon its substantial laurels in 2019,the 2.7-liter EcoBoost V-6, 3.5-liter EcoBoost V-6, 5.0-liter V-8 and new 3.0-liter Power Stroke turbodiesel V-6 will all be paired with a 10-speed automatic, while the base 3.3-liter V-6 engine will carry on with a six-speed automatic.

In addition to well-known models like the XL, XLT, Lariat, King Ranch, Platinum and off-road focused Raptor, Ford has added the new Limited. Packing the Raptor’s high-output 3.5-liter EcoBoost V-6 engine, the Limited will boast 450 horsepower and 510 lb-ft of torque, making it the most powerful and luxurious F-150 ever.

Black 2019 Ford F-150 driving on street next to body of water
With a high-output 3.5-liter EcoBoost V-6 engine, the new Limited is the most powerful F-150 to date.

Towing Features

If we’re honest, Ford doesn’t do a great job of promoting RV-specific features, often hiding them in equipment groups on its website’s vehicle configurator. But if you are careful when ordering, you can take advantage of some useful equipment:

Ford F-150 Dynamic Hitch Assist
Dynamic Hitch Assist makes lining up the trailer hitch ball or fifth-wheel kingpin easier than ever.

Dynamic Hitch Assist with Line-of-Sight Guide: Backup cameras certainly aren’t new, and neither are those that offer “dynamic” guidelines that bend as you turn the steering wheel. But Ford’s system incorporates another line right off the trailer hitch, so you can back directly under the hitch ball, first time, every time.

Blind Spot Information System (BLIS) with Cross-Traffic Alert and Trailer Tow Monitoring: We love blind-spot monitoring systems, especially in high-riding trucks that can make it difficult to see a small car or motorcycle. Ford’s BLIS system offers your typical blind-spot and rear cross-traffic alerts (useful when backing out of a parking space, for example), but takes it one step further by letting you know if a vehicle is alongside your trailer, too.

EcoBoost Payload Package: The 2.7-liter EcoBoost is a surprisingly capable engine, but this package makes towing easier and more reliable with a 3.73:1 electronic-locking rear axle and a larger 9.75-inch ring-and-pinion gearset. The package is available on F-150 XL and XLT models with the 2.7-liter V-6 EcoBoost engine.

Pro Trailer Backup Assist: It takes a seasoned RVer to expertly back a trailer, but this feature lets everyone get it right the first time. Turn the system on by pushing a button in the center of the dash-mounted knob, put the vehicle in reverse, take your hands off the steering wheel and turn the knob the direction you want the trailer to go. The vehicle’s rearview camera reads the position of a target sticker that the owner places on the trailer’s A-frame, giving the system a reference point. As you turn the knob, the steering wheel turns on its own in relation to your inputs, and you’re backing like a real pro.

Trailer Tow Package: Just about every truck offers one of these, but some are better equipped than others. Ford’s basic Trailer Tow Package includes a four-pin/seven-pin wiring harness, auxiliary transmission oil cooler, Class IV trailer hitch receiver, Pro Trailer Backup Assist (not included on XL base), Tailgate LED (standard on Lariat and higher), Smart Trailer Tow Connector (alerts to connectivity issues, lighting and battery problems; standard on Lariat and higher) and an upgraded front stabilizer bar.

Max Trailer Tow Package (requires 3.5-liter EcoBoost engine): In addition to the Trailer Tow Package above, this package includes a 3.55:1 electronic-locking rear-axle, 36-gallon fuel tank, integrated trailer-brake controller and upgraded rear bumper. Just remember that neither towing package includes trailer tow mirrors, which are a stand-alone option and must be ordered separately. The package is offered on Lariat, King Ranch and Platinum models.

Ford continues to push the envelope to make sure its best-selling F-150 remains on top.
Ford continues to push the envelope — inside and out — to make sure its best-selling F-150 remains on top.

Tow Limits

2019 Ford F-150
3.3 V-6:
7,700 lbs.
2.7L EcoBoost V-6: 9,000 lbs.
5.0-liter V-8: 11,300 lbs.
3.0L Turbo Diesel V-6: 11,300 lbs.
3.5L EcoBoost V-6: 13,200 lbs.

Inside the Ford F 150 Limited
The F-150 Limited combines a powerful engine with interior comforts like heated and ventilated front seats.

Base MSRP

XL: $28,155
XLT: $34,160
Lariat: $41,700
King Ranch: $52,390
Raptor: $52,855
Platinum: $54,920
Limited: $67,135


Trailer Life contributor Chris HemerA frequent contributor to Trailer Life, Chris Hemer is the former technical editor of Trailer Life and MotorHome, and has been an RV and automotive journalist for more than 20 years. An outdoor enthusiast who now makes his home in Portland, Oregon, he enjoys camping, motorcycle riding, mountain biking and hiking.


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7 COMMENTS

  1. I was just on Ford’s Build-and-Price website and tried to find an “EcoBoost Payload Package” with a 3.73 locking axle. Such a package does not appear to exist for the 2019 F-150 SuperCrew 5.5′ box Lariat. Can you tell me the source of your information?

    • From author Chris Hemer: The 2.7-liter EcoBoost Payload Package is available on the F-150 XL and XLT with 2.7-liter V-6 EcoBoost engine. The Max Trailer Tow Package is offered on Lariat, King Ranch and Platinum models. If you try building different trim levels on the Ford website, go to “Packages”; you’ll see what’s available on the specific model you’re configuring.

  2. Hi Chris. Always enjoy your no-nonsense articles. I have a 40-foot Heartland Mallard 335 with a weight of 9,000 pounds. I currently have a 2008 F-250 with V-10. So if I read this correctly, I can have more towing capacity with the F-150 3.5-liter V-6 than I currently have. Or would you recommend a different truck for my needs? Thanks.

    • Chester: Chris Hemer is a frequent contributor to Trailer Life, but he is not available to respond to readers’ questions about individual towing circumstances. You may want to consider submitting your question to Trailer Life’s RV Clinic column at [email protected]. Although time does not permit direct replies, many of the questions asked by readers are answered in the monthly column.

  3. Nice 150/1500 model trucks you show. Now, how about some 250/2500 or 350/3500 trucks that most RVers need to pull those fifth-wheels that require at least a 15k payload?

  4. I purchased a 2015 F-150 with the 3.5-liter EcoBoost Lariat with the tow package in 2016 new. I towed to Alaska, Yukon and the Arctic Circle in Alaska. We came back via British Columbia and Oregon. We visited in Wyoming, Colorado, Illinois, Indiana and Ohio, and the trip ended in Pennsylvania. We towed a 30-foot Puma 2005 trailer weighed out at about 9,000 pounds. This was its second trip of over 15,000 miles. The only failure on the trip was the brake controller and the throttle body. The engine and truck performed fantastically. When we lost the brake controller, if it weren’t for the jake brake, we would have been dead in the water because of the hills (mountains) we had to go down. I did replace the rotors and brake pads. At the end of the trip, the rotors were warped. Great truck, very confortable, great ride and power for a V-6.

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